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School-wide Positive Behavior Support
Implementers’ Blueprint and Self-Assessment1, 2

OSEP Center on Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports3

University of Oregon
www.pbis.org

The OSEP Center on Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports is grateful to the students, educators, adminis trators, families, support providers, researchers, and teacher trainers who have worked tirelessly to improve educational outcomes for all students and who have con tributed to our understanding of the critical practices and systems of positive behavior support.

These materials have been developed to assist local and state education agents in their efforts to improve school climate and positive behavior support for all students. Photocopying, use, and/or sale of these materials are forbidden without expressed written permission by the OSEP Center for Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports. To obtain a personal copy of these materials, contact the Center at 541-346-2505, pbis@oregon.uoregon.edu, or www.pbis.org.

INTRODUCTION

Statement of Purpose

The purpose of this blueprint is to present a rationale for adopting school-wide positive behavior support (SW-PBS), describe the key features of SW-PBS, and illustrate processes, structures, and supports of SW-PBS.

Definition of a Blueprint

A "blueprint" is a guide designed to improve the efficiency and success of large-scale replications of a specific demonstration or example. SW-PBS has been demonstrated to be a feasible and valued approach for improving the social climate of schools and supporting intervention programming for students with high risk problem behavior.

This blueprint is intended to make the conceptual theory, organizational models, and specific practices more accessible for those involved in changing how schools, districts, and state education systems operate effectively and efficiently.

The contents of this blueprint should be considered dynamic and iterative in that guidelines will be improved as new implementations are tried and studied, and as new research is conducted.

Audience for the Blueprint

This blueprint is designed for use by individuals who are interested in or are implementing SW-PBS, and/or interested in tactics for sustaining or expanding (go-to-scale) their efforts. Implementers include school, district, and state level administrators; staff developers; educational policy and decision makers; higher education personnel preparers; consultants; program evaluators; and researchers.

Using the Blueprint

The organization of this blueprint emphasizes efficient and effective implementation. To the greatest extent possible, (a) descriptive task analyses and checklists are used to sequence procedures and processes, (b) sample forms and worksheets are provided to enhance task completion, and (c) examples are included. To support and extend implementation efforts, references and additional resources are included in appendices. The contents of this blueprint should be viewed as a "guide" to essential of effective SW-PBS implementation rather than a "cookbook" of practices and systems.

This blueprint is divided into two main sections:

  • Section I: Describing School-wide Positive Behavior Supports

    In this section, a rationale for adopting a school-wide positive behavior support approach is provided, and the features of this approach are described.
  • Section II: Implementing a Systems Approach to School-wide Positive Behavior Supports

    In this section, the organizational processes, structures, and supports for adopting a systems approach to SW-PBS are described. School-, district-, and state-wide implementation features are described. The use of a self-assessment checklist is emphasized.

1The Center is supported by a grant from the Office of Special Education Programs US Department of Education (H326S980003). Opinions expressed herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the position of the US Department of Education, and such endorsements should not be inferred. For more information, contact Rob Horner (Robh@uoregon.edu) or George Sugai (Sugai@uoregon.edu).

22004 Center on Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports, University of Oregon.

3The Center is supported by a grant from the Office of Special Education Programs US Department of Education (H326S980003). Opinions expressed herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the position of the US Department of Education, and such endorsements should not be inferred.

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